Unlock Your Potential: How Many Muay Thai Kicks a Day Should You Do for Optimal Results?

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As a dedicated Muay Thai practitioner, I constantly seek ways to improve my skills and conditioning. One question that has been on my mind lately is how many Muay Thai kicks a day should I be doing to see noticeable improvements in my technique and power? After all, Muay Thai is known for its devastating kicks, and it’s essential to develop solid and precise kicks to succeed in this martial art.

Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced fighter, the number of kicks you should do daily can vary depending on your goals and current fitness level. However, some general guidelines can help you get started and progress toward your goals. In this article, we’ll explore the benefits of doing Muay Thai kicks, how many kicks you should aim for each day, and some tips to help you stay motivated and avoid injury.

How Many Muay Thai Kicks A Day?

As a Muay Thai practitioner, people often ask me how many kicks I do daily. The answer to this question varies depending on my training routine and goals. However, general guidelines can help determine how many kicks you should do daily.

Firstly, it’s essential to warm up properly before starting any Muay Thai training. This will help prevent injuries and ensure you get the most out of your workout. Once you’re warmed up, you can start practicing your kicks.

Beginners should aim to do around 50 kicks per leg per day. This may sound like a lot, but gradually building up your strength and technique is important. As you become more experienced, you can increase the number of kicks you do per day.

If you’re training for a fight, you may need to do more daily kicks to build up your endurance and power. In this case, you should aim to do at least 100 kicks per leg daily. However, it’s essential to listen to your body and not push yourself too hard. Overtraining can lead to injuries and setbacks in your training.

Remember, quality is more important than quantity regarding Muay Thai kicks. Focus on perfecting your technique and building up your strength gradually. With consistent practice and dedication, you can do more daily kicks and improve your overall performance.

The Basics of Muay Thai Kicks

As a practitioner of Muay Thai, I know how vital kicks are in this martial art. Not only do they allow you to keep your opponent at a distance, but they can also be used to inflict severe damage. In this section, I will review some of the most common kicks used in Muay Thai and how to execute them properly.

Roundhouse Kick

The roundhouse kick is one of the most iconic kicks in Muay Thai. It is a powerful kick that can attack your opponent’s ribs, thighs, or head. To execute a roundhouse kick:

  1. Start in your fighting stance with your lead leg slightly bent.
  2. Pivot on your lead foot and bring your rear leg up and across your body, striking your opponent with the shin or instep of your foot.
  3. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.
The roundhouse kick is one of the most iconic kicks in Muay Thai

Low Kick

The low kick is a devastating kick that targets your opponent’s thigh. It can quickly wear down your opponent’s leg, making it more difficult for them to move and defend themselves. To execute a low kick:

  1. Step forward with your lead leg and pivot on your supporting foot.
  2. Bring your rear leg up and strike your opponent’s thigh with your shin or foot.
  3. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.
The low kick is a devastating kick that targets your opponent's thigh
Image source: blackbeltmag.com

Teep

The teep, also known as the push kick, is a versatile kick that can keep your opponent at a distance or knock them off balance. To execute a teep:

  1. Start your fighting stance and lift your lead leg, keeping your knee bent.
  2. Extend your leg forward and push your opponent away with the ball of your foot.
  3. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.
The teep is a versatile kick that can keep your opponent at a distance or knock them off balance
Image source: muay-thai-guy.com

Question Mark Kick

The question mark kick is a deceptive kick that starts like a low kick but then changes direction mid-kick to target your opponent’s head. To execute a question mark kick, begin in your fighting stance and throw a low kick with your lead leg. Just before your foot makes contact with your opponent’s thigh, pivot on your supporting foot and bring your leg up to strike your opponent’s head with the instep of your foot. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.

The question mark kick is a deceptive low kick that changes direction mid-kick to target the opponent's head
Image source: scorum.com

Switch Kick

The switch kick is a quick and powerful kick that can surprise your opponent. To execute a switch kick:

  1. Start your fighting stance and switch your lead foot with your rear foot.
  2. As you do this, bring your lead leg up and across your body, striking your opponent with the shin or instep of your foot.
  3. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.
The switch kick is a quick and powerful kick that can surprise your opponent.
Image source: junipermuaythai.com

Axe Kick

The axe kick is powerful and targets your opponent’s head or collarbone. To execute an axe kick:

  1. Start your fighting stance and lift your lead leg, keeping your knee bent.
  2. Bring your leg up and over your head, striking your opponent with the heel of your foot.
  3. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.
The axe kick is powerful and targets your opponent's head or collarbone
Image source: onefc.com

Jumping Push Kick

The jumping push kick, also known as the flying teep, is a flashy kick that can be used to surprise your opponent. To execute a jumping push kick, start in your fighting stance and jump forward, bringing your lead leg up and extending it to push your opponent away with the ball of your foot. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.

Foot Jab

The foot jab, also known as the front kick, is a quick and versatile kick that can keep your opponent at a distance or set up other strikes. To execute a foot jab:

  1. Start your fighting stance and lift your lead leg, keeping your knee bent.
  2. Extend your leg forward and push your opponent away with the ball of your foot.
  3. Keep your guard up and your supporting leg stable to maintain balance.

Advanced Muay Thai Kicks

As I continue to train in Muay Thai, incorporating advanced kicks into my routine has dramatically improved my technique and overall conditioning. In this section, I will discuss some of the most effective advanced kicks and how to execute them properly.

Head Kick

The head kick is a powerful and devastating attack that can end a fight quickly if executed correctly. To perform a head kick:

  1. Start by lifting your lead leg and pivoting on your back foot.
  2. As you pivot, swing your lead leg up and across your body, aiming for your opponent’s head.
  3. Keep your hands up to protect yourself, and use your hips to generate power.

It’s important to note that the head kick is a high-risk move and should only be attempted by experienced fighters. Improper execution can leave you open to counter-attacks and leave you off-balance.

Spinning Back Kick

The spinning back kick is a flashy but effective technique that can catch your opponent off guard. To perform a spinning back kick, turn your back to your opponent and lift your lead leg. As you turn back towards your opponent, swing your lead leg around and strike with the heel of your foot.

Like the head kick, the spinning back kick requires proper technique and timing. It’s essential to practice this move with a partner or on a heavy bag before attempting it in sparring.

Wheel Kick

The wheel kick, also known as the reverse roundhouse kick, is a powerful and unpredictable attack that can cause severe damage. To perform a wheel kick, lift your lead leg and pivot on your back foot. As you rotate, swing your lead leg in a circular motion and strike with the heel of your foot.

Keep your hands up to protect yourself, and use your hips to generate power. The wheel kick is challenging to master, but it can become a valuable weapon in your arsenal with practice.

Adding advanced kicks to your training routine can help improve your technique and conditioning. However, starting slowly and working your way up to more complex moves is important. Incorporate these kicks into your sparring sessions and focus on proper technique to avoid injury.

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Muay Thai Kick Scoring and Techniques

Muay Thai Scoring

In Muay Thai, kicks are an essential part of scoring points. The scoring system is based on the effectiveness of the strikes, and kicks are considered the most effective. Low, head and high kicks are all scored based on power, accuracy, and technique. Push kicks, also known as front kicks or teeps, are also scored but are considered less effective than other kicks.

Defense

Defenders can use several techniques to defend against kicks. One of the most common is to check the kick, using the shin to block the attacker’s leg. Another method is to catch the kick and counter-attack with a punch or knee strike. It’s essential to keep a good range and know the attacker’s movements to avoid getting hit.

Range

The range is also essential in Muay Thai, especially regarding kicks. One can deliver kicks from various capacities, including midair and close range. A good Muay Thai fighter should be able to adjust their range based on the situation and the opponent’s movements. Fighters can also use their arms to control the range by blocking or grabbing the opponent’s limbs.

100 Roundhouse Kicks A Day in 30 Days

Conclusions

Overall, mastering Muay Thai kicks and practicing how many Muay Thai kicks a day is an essential part of the sport, as it can lead to a higher chance of knockout. With proper technique and training, anyone can learn to deliver robust and effective kicks in the ring.

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Michael B. Ryan

Michael is a passionate Muay Thai enthusiast and founder of Fancy Muay Thai. He shares tips and resources to help others improve their skills and provides unbiased product reviews.

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